How are Appraisal Review Board members appointed?

Brendan Reeder Sep 01, 2021
2 min read
How are Appraisal Review Board members appointed?

How are Appraisal Review Board Members Appointed?

Appraisal Review Boards

If you own property in Texas and have ever appealed the noticed value, you most likely have dealt with an Appraisal Review Board (ARB). These ARBs handle valuation disputes between taxpayers and Central Appraisal Districts (CADs) by holding hearings where both parties present evidence and support for their valuation. At the conclusion of these hearings, ARB board members issue a decision and can change the market value of a property if they find it appropriate. Typically, an ARB hearing will consist of three to five board members from a larger pool of active members that varies in size depending on the size of the county.

Selection of ARB Members

Now that we understand the role an ARB plays in setting property values, the question that often seems to pop up in peoples’ minds is “who are these ARB members and how are they chosen to sit on the board”? This is an important question which is easily answered. For starters, there are no special requirements for ARB members to be on the board other than they must be a resident of the appraisal district for two or more years before taking office. This requirement is universal throughout all of Texas. While there are certain rules that restrict an individual serving on the ARB panel, they primarily depend upon conflicts of interests from serving rather than the potential board member’s knowledge or experience in appraisal work. However, who gets to choose and approve these members depends on the population of a county. If a county has a population of 120,000 or more, ARB members are appointed by the local administrative district judge. Alternatively, if a county has a population of less than 120,000, the board of directors for that county appoints the ARB members.

If you have any more questions about your local ARB board and its operations, please contact one of our Texas multifamily property specialists today for information.

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